Chris FIORESCU has been assisting us since October 2002 as a guest. The White Shark Trust Field Research Assistantship is proud to introduce you to our assistants:

Lydia HO from Toronto (Canada), Costa KONNARIS from Cyprus, Jennie SANDBERG from Galveston (USA), Linda HEAP from Perth (Australia) and Paul GROVES from Perth (Australia).

On Monday the 10th of February, I had to go to the University of Cape Town. Linda, Jenny and Paul came along and went to the Aquarium, and then we visited the Cape Peninsula...

We stoped on Sir Lowri's pass to admire the view over False Bay and Table Mountain.

In Simon's Town (that is where Paul Simon lives according to Jenny), we visited Boulders Beach and it colony of African Penguins... It was such a hot day (40 degrees Celcius probably), that we even had a swim in the ocean to cool us down...
Jenny and Linda have proven that primate interaction is possible...

We visited the Cape of Good Hope at the extreme tip of the Cape Peninsula... Baboons are swarming the area since they have learned that tourists are just the most stupid species there is...

Baboons have discovered the same good taste for ice-cream as we have: this one seems to greatly enjoy his Magnum, which he probably stole from one of those depictable and senseless tourists visiting the area.

Beware of the snakes!

Tuesday the 11th of February, we went out to Dyer Island again... we only observed one shark swimming past our bait a couple of times...

Costas was fishing and caught a dozen catsharks and shysharks... as well as our supper!

Wednesday the 12th of February, we had to wait for Jaws' brakes to be fixed... so we spent the whole afternoon at sea. We observed two "lazy" sharks swimming around the bait... not very interested in us though... but at least we saw two sharks!
Paul GROVES' experience with the White Shark Trust Field Research Assistantship as told by himself...
All went well during my time with Michael & Tracy and the White Shark Trust. Although we probably experienced the all time quietest period for shark sightings, it was still an awesome experience.

To see these animals at such close quarters was simply brilliant, and to see the results of the work being done was cool.

A lot of time at sea is spent 'in waiting' for a shark to appear, or at least it did whilst I was there!!

My only suggestions to willing participants are to bring good seasick pills if you get seasick, and don't bring the song 'bad to the bone' with you, unless you really like scary rides.

Overall, a really worthwhile experience, especially if you are a shark enthusiast!