The White Shark Trust Field Research Assistantship is proud to introduce you to our assistants:

TJ BARANEK from Pewaukee (Wisconsin, USA), Alan DUNCAN (Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland), Chris MILNES (Grantham, Lincolnshire, England) and Rhiannon COLLINGBORN (Chippenham, Wilts, England)

A dead Humpback Whale washed up on the shores near Gansbaai and Dyer Island during the night of the 8th to the 9th of September 2003... We went to look at the carcass on Tuesday morning the 9th of September, and we observed several shark bite marks...

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We returned to the Humpback Whale site the following morning on Wednesday the 10th of September at low tide... the carcass had moved a bit further along the shore, and we managed to have a better look at the many bite scars.
The week was miserable... some rain, strong winds and heavy seas... We finally managed to return to sea on Sunday the 14th of September... We anchored just offshore of the whale carcass on the beach... it was a very windy day with winds reaching 34 knots. The sea was quite choppy and the water was extremely murky. The two sharks we observed were barely visible when close to the surface...
On Sunday afternoon, we all took a drive to the Humpback Whale site... it is starting to get smelly in that area, but fortunatelly the offshore wind made it okay. The carcass is indeed in the water at high tide, but the surrounding area is too shallow to allow sharks to come in at high tide unfortunatelly...
On Monday the 15th of September 2003, we went to sea again... the wind conditions were very similar to yesterday with gusts over 30 knots. It was a slow day and the sharks did not remain around the boat for very long. But we observed seven sharks. The visibility was slightly better as we anchored further offshore.

Rhiannon with her sunglasses (above)... and her new look (below) with the NCG (Natural Contraceptive Glasses)! As little as these glasses will ever be used as an attractant to the opposite (or same for that matter) sex, they do work when you try to see through the water surface and glare...

The following photographs were taken by Alan Duncan during his second week at the White Shark Trust Field Research Assistantship...