The workshop, organised by the Wildlife Conservation Society, brought together scientists from around the world with the aim of sharing, comparing and synthesizing research findings and identifying conservation priorities for Great White Sharks.

Invited participants from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, South Africa and the USA included researchers working in the movements and migrations of White Sharks, population census through photographic identification of individuals, trade in White Shark parts, population genetics, management of non-consumptive utilization, and specialists in international conservation mechanisms.

The main objectives and expected outputs of the workshop were:

  1. Synthesize recent global research findings that are directly relevant to the conservation of White Sharks, particularly in terms of space utilization and movement and their relation to risk-exposure to fishing outside protected areas, international trade, and forensics;
  2. Assess the state of our knowledge about the distribution and status of White Sharks throughout their range;
  3. Identify current threats to White Sharks survival, and create a framework for assessing and mitigating these threats;
  4. Outline a document based on the above findings and highlighting the global threats to White Sharks, to be submitted to the CITES Animals Committee Meeting in March 2004;
  5. Identify priority areas for White Shark conservation efforts, prioritize topics for further research and discuss technological problems for achieving them, and further investigate key themes that are essential to ensure White Shark conservation throughout their range;
  6. Explore the possibility of putting some of our findings into a joint scientific paper to be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journal in the immediate future; and
  7. Establish a linkage between key White Shark researchers in order to facilitate information exchange, standardization of methods, and cooperation.
The following presentations were given by the workshop participants:

(in alphabetical order of the first author - underlined names indicate the presenter)

Long-Range Spatial Dynamics of the Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) in South Africa Using Satellite Tags: Science for Conservation and Resource Management

Ramon BONFIL1, Shannon O'BRIEN1, Michael MEYER2, Michael SCHOLL34, Ryan JOHNSON5, Herman OOSTHUIZEN2 and Sheldon DUDLEY6

1 Wildlife Conservation Society, New York, USA

2 Marine and Coastal Management, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT), Cape Town, South Africa

3 White Shark Trust, Strand Street 6, P.O. Box 1258, Gansbaai 7220, Western Cape, South Africa

4 Zoology Departement, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, South Africa

5 University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

6 Natal Sharks Board, Durban, South Africa

Movement Patterns and Habitat Preference of Adult White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) Electronically Tagged off the Central Californian Coast

Andre BOUSTANY, Kevin WENG, Barbara BLOCK, Peter PYLE and Scot ANDERSON

University of Stanford, California, USA

Movement Patterns and Behaviour of White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in Australia

Barry BRUCE and John STEVENS

CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia

Summary of Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) Research Activities at Isla Guadalupe, Mexico

Michael L. DOMEIER

Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research (PIER), California, USA

International Trade in White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) Goods from New Zealand: Fisheries and Trade Monitoring, International Implications and Recent Policy Developments

Clinton DUFFY

Science and Research Unit, Department of Conservation, P.O. Box 112, Hamilton, New Zealand

The White Shark and CITES: A Personal View

Sarah FOWLER

IUCN Shark Specialist Group

Ryan JOHNSON

University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Marine and Coastal Management, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT), Cape Town, South Africa

Marine-Based Tourism (MBT) in Gansbaai, South Africa: A Socio-Economic Study

Irma MAHARAJ and Herman OOSTHUIZEN

Marine and Coastal Management, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT), Cape Town, South Africa

Long-Term Individual Photographic Identification Methodology and Population Structure of Great White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) at Dyer Island, South Africa

Michael C. SCHOLL12

1 White Shark Trust, Strand Street 6, P.O. Box 1258, Gansbaai 7220, Western Cape, South Africa

2 Zoology Departement, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, South Africa

Applying New DNA Forensic Methods to Monitor Trade in Shark Products, with Special Reference to Great White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias)

Mahmood S. SHIVJI1, Demian D. CHAPMAN1 and Ellen K.PIKITCH2

1 Guy Harvey Research Institute, Oceanographic Center, Nova Southeastern University, 8000 North Ocean Drive, Dania Beach, Florida 33004 USA

2 Pew Institute for Ocean Science, University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, 126 East 56th Street, Suite 0010, New York, NY, 10022 USA

An Oceanographic GIS System Supporting White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) Tagging Studies: Integrated Web-Based Visualization

Vardis TSONTOS

University of Southern California, California, USA

The workshop also welcomed the following participants:
Sonja FORDHAM (CMC, Washington DC, USA)
Alison KOCK (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
Karl LAROCHE (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Liz LAUCK (WCS, New York, USA)
Colin McIFF (OES, Department of State, Washington DC, USA)
Shannon O'BRIEN (WCS, New York, USA)
Ellen PIKITCH (PEW Oceans Institute, Florida, USA)
Hans WALTER (NY Aquarium, New York, USA)